The MakeUp Book Tag

A friend of mine tagged me in this. Shameless plug: Check out her blog, it’s filled with such good book recs – I swear my reading list keeps growing, not shrinking. (Picture Credit: Once Upon a Bookshelf)

So here goes!

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These Books Can Teach You to Be the Best at Anything

TIME

After my post What does it take to become an expert at anything? a number of people have written, curious about where to learn more on the subject.

A few of the best sources I pulled from are below, with links and descriptions:

Bounce: Mozart, Federer, Picasso, Beckham, and the Science of Success

“Backed by cutting-edge scientific research and case studies, Syed shatters long-held myths about meritocracy, talent, performance, and the mind. He explains why some people thrive under pressure and others choke, and weighs the value of innate ability against that of practice, hard work, and will.”

Check it out here.

Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About Getting It Right When You Have To

“Dr. Sian Beilock, an expert on performance and brain science, reveals inChoke the astonishing new science of why we all too often blunder when the stakes are high. What happens…

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J.K. Rowling’s Mysterious Riddle Was Solved

TIME

About 24 hours after author J.K. Rowling posted an anagram on her Twitter account, a fan has finally solved the puzzle.

Emily Strong—a PhD student at the University of Sheffield who regularly updates her own blog and describes herself as a lover of “all things Harry Potter” in her Twitter bio—tweeted the solution at the Harry Potter author on Tuesday afternoon: “Newt Scamander only meant to stay in New York for a few hours.”

Rowling confirmed her answer within two minutes:

The anagram, according to TIME’s own interactive anagram solver, does indeed check out. It’s a reference to Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, a Harry Potter spinoff that will soon hit the big screen as a trilogy.

Despite saying in her initial tweet that she was busy working on a novel…

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Your summer reading list: Rashida Jones, Elizabeth Gilbert, Bill and Melinda Gates and many more share their book recommendations

More books to add to my reading list!

TED Blog

Books - vector illustration

Summer: the season for cracking open a good book under the shade of a tree. Below, we’ve compiled about 70 stellar book recommendations from members of the TED community. Warning: not all of these books can be classified as beach reads. And we think that is a good thing.

books-Elizabeth-GilbertPicks from Elizabeth Gilbert, author 

The Principles of Uncertainty by Maira Kalman. “The only book I have ever bought by the crate-load. I give copies of this sumptuous masterpiece to everyone I care about. I could try to describe it further, but … it would be more efficient if you just read it yourself. (Watch Maira Kalman’s TED Talk, “The illustrated woman.”)

Age of Wonder: The Romantic Generation and the Discovery of the Beauty and Terror in Science by Richard Holmes. “I just finished writing a novel about
18th- and 19th-century scientific exploration, and this engaging book was a…

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Book Review Sunday: Know Your Power

This week’s Book Review is Know Your Power: A Mesage to America’s Daughters by former Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi.

Ahh sorry this week’s Book Review Saturday is late (hence why it’s Book Review Sunday). I went to see Malaficent yesterday with my friends, and oh my god it was amazing! It was much better than Sleeping Beauty because all the characters had a lot of depth, including Aurora, who wasn’t just a princess to sleep and be kissed by “a savior”. Even the raven was a character with a lot of depth. And Angelina Jolie was bloody awesome as Malaficent and she really showed an array of emotions as her character. And I can’t stop gushing about how awesome the movie is. Just go watch it!  

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“When I am writing, I am trying to find out who I am.”

Rest in peace, Maya Angelou. You were one of my favorite poets and authors, and I – along with the rest of the world (lets exclude the irrational beings, shall we?) will miss your ability to string words together to create such beautiful imagery and stories, in poetry and prose.

The Daily Post

Maya Angelou by Spanglej, CC BY-SA 2.0.Maya Angelou by Spanglej, CC BY-SA 2.0.

Words mean more than what is set down on paper. It takes the human voice to infuse them with deeper meaning.

Find a beautiful piece of art. If you fall in love with Van Gogh or Matisse or John Oliver Killens, or if you fall love with the music of Coltrane, the music of Aretha Franklin, or the music of Chopin — find some beautiful art and admire it, and realize that it was created by human beings just like you, no more human, no less.

There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.

The idea is to write it so that people hear it and it slides through the brain and goes straight to the heart.

When I am writing, I am trying to find out who I am, who we are, what we’re capable of, how…

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Heart Transplant, by Andrew Vachss and Frank Caruso

Blogging for a Good Book

heartHeart Transplant is a story about bullying that is both engrossing and heartwarming. In the opening narration, a kid named Sean takes down the movie clichés about high school life, where outsiders are able to rise above their social position when the popular kids realize they are a beautiful swan instead of an ugly duckling, or the beautiful girl learns about how great the nerd is on the inside and rejects her jock boyfriend. Sean is an outsider, and as such he is ignored by the more popular kids unless it is convenient for them to notice him. “The only time anyone ever saw us was when they needed someone to make themselves look big. By making us small.”

Sean is from a terrible, broken home. His mother has had a steady stream of live-in boyfriends, each of which she has insisted that Sean call “Daddy.” Her latest one, Brian…

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